“clean pee off couch _cat pee removal products”

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Well, we finally had to euthanize our dog for congestive heart failure about six months after the start of this urine issue. A month or so afterwards, the carpet odors were undetectable. I’m not sure which product did the “trick,” or if it was just a matter of time for the smell to dissipate. It also could have been that somehow our dog was periodically urinating in the same spots without us noticing.
This is why it is absolutely essential to use a cleaner that can break down the uric acid. Soap, vinegar, baking soda, ammonia, chlorine, and hydrogen peroxide (to name the most common cleaners) simply are not chemically capable of breaking down the uric acid in cat pee. These cleaners and deodorizers only temporarily make the smell go away and appear to work because they do clean up the other components of the cat urine. But when exposed to humidity, the uric acid salts cause the uric acid crystals to reform. This process releases the smell again; not always at levels detectable to the human nose, but the cats’ more sensitive noses can smell it. And the scent of their urine outside of the litter box encourages many cats to continue urinating outside of the box, often with their families left scratching their heads wondering why.
Cats may spray for territorial reasons or when they feel anxious or threatened. The presence of stray cats in your yard may cause your cat to mark near windows and doors as a way to identify that this is his territory. New pets in the household, or a conflict between existing pets in the same household, may also make pets feel a need to mark their territories. Changes in your cat’s environment, such as rearranging his living space or moving to a new home, can add stress and induce marking. Occasionally, spraying cat may target the clothing or bedding of a person or visitor in the house.
5.  Skunked Pet – fortunately, we didn’t have the displeasure of testing out this awful stench firsthand, but my friend at CTI Clean used Stinkers! to neutralize an entire vial of skunk spray, and she made a video of it for you to check out: 
As a general rule, you should keep as many litter boxes as you have cats in the house, plus one.  You can also try removing the cover of your cat’s litter box (if it has one) or changing the type of litter you use to encourage your cat to use his or her box.
When urine dries, it leaves behind crystals in the carpet fibre which attract water – so wee stains in carpet tend to always be a bit damp from the moisture in the air.. which means that they always pong a bit.
I had a spot on the carpet where the cat had peed several times. I did not treat the spot before ordering Stink Free. I pulled up the carpet and cut out the padding and to expose the backside of the carpet. I poured on Stink Free and the odor seemed to go away but came back within an hour .I kept pouring on the solution, top and bottom of the carpet. I placed a towel underneath so liquid would not soak into the concrete slab. This went on for days until the bottle was empty. The carpet still stinks and has a huge urine stain which wasn’t there before. I have to conclude that Stink Free does not work.
Obviously the best long-term solution is to get the little guy going potty outside. I am not sure what your process is, but adding the use of a crate/kennel (or in your case pen) to the regime can be helpful, in addition to positive re-enforcement. It’s a total pain, but it really cuts down on the accidents and is worth it in the long run. So for example as soon as the puppy wakes up, take him outside to go potty. If he goes throw a party and have a little play session. If he doesn’t go within 5 minutes or so, bring him back inside and place him in his pen-there isn’t any fun time until his business is done. Anywhere from 5-15 minutes later repeat the above process. When he does go, he gets let out to play run around etc. etc. but not before. Again it’s a hassle, but it really cuts down on missing any accidents in hidden places, and they pick up quick on the positive re-enforcement and learn to hurry up and potty so they can play!
Alternative 1: Vinegar and baking soda. Soak up as much urine as possible from the upholstery. Liberally sprinkle baking soda on the stain, and let it sit for 5 minutes. The baking soda will help to deodorize the stain. In a spray bottle or other container, mix equal parts water and distilled white vinegar. Spray or pour the mixture onto the baking soda-covered stain, and let sit for another 5 minutes. Then blot the stain with a cloth or paper towel to dry it.
Finally, your cat might not be fond of their litter box situation. It could be because they don’t like the type of litter you’ve made available, because they don’t like the box style, or because the box isn’t clean enough. As always, examining when this behavior began and linking it to changes in your cat’s environment is an important part of stopping the behavior.
I am very surprised at all the good reviews on Odorzout products. Not sure why it seems to work for some and not others. I have the laundry one as well as this all purpose one and I have had NO LUCK at all with using this. My husbands work clothes were the main test for the laundry version of this and it FAILED miserably, over and over. It failed even on minor odors so this is all a waste of money to me. I have recently read reviews of what a nightmare it is to vacuum up from carpet and floors if you don’t have a strong shop vac and I can see where that would be the case. If you are desperate it may be worth trying since it seems to work for some.
Ashley, it won’t ruin your clothes- has never ruined mine! They’re pretty gentle cleansers. Once you’ve efficiently removed the ammonia from them (with the vinegar and baking soda) you might even try an extra wash using OxyClean. I love that stuff and it’s never failed to remove nasty odors. I just don’t know that I would mix it with straight cat urine, so that’s why I suggest using it after thoroughly rinsing the items first.
Blot the urine on your carpet with paper towels. Try to remove as much of the urine as possible. This will ultimately make your job easier. Use clean paper towels and apply pressure. Repeat with new paper towels until you are unable to soak up any more urine.[1]
Re-wet the spot with water. After you’ve lifted the towel, pour a small amount of cold water over the spot again. Start pouring just outside the perimeter of the stain, slowly moving toward the center. This will prevent the water from spreading the urine out into an even wider circle. Allow the water to work through the stain for about a minute.