Wash your bed. Snuggling with your pet in bed can be blissful. However, it’s important to wash your bed often and well, since it will likely be harboring pet odors too. Strip pillow cases, sheets, fitted sheets, duvet covers, and blankets from the bed. Machine wash all the linens and blankets. Add ¼ cup (59 ml) of vinegar to the wash for extra odor-fighting power.[7] Air or tumble dry all the bedding.
Great article Sally, definitely covers this topic in-depth! However, we’ve got some carpets in a rental apartment that have old, and I mean really old, and now somewhat crusty, pee. What would you recommend as the best carpet cleaner for old pet urine?
Wet paper or cloth towels with cool water, and lay them over the spot. Put a heavy object on top of the wet towels and leave the towels overnight. When you remove it in the morning, you can assess whether or not you need to take more extreme measures.
It might sound strange to think that something as pungent as vinegar removes odors, but it does. Some pet odors, like a dog’s body funk that seeps into your linens or couch, are the result of alkaline chemicals, which the acids in vinegar neutralize, just as baking soda neutralizes acid odors.
Try cleaning without detergent at first. If you find that you’re still not pulling up the stain, ask the representatives at the rental center what they recommend, and try to use as little detergent as possible.
Absorb smells with a deodorizer. There are lots of deodorizers that can target pesky pet smells. You can purchase one from the store, or make your own if you’re feeling crafty and thrifty. Two of the most popular items are baking soda and vinegar, which you can spray around the house, on carpets, on beds, and elsewhere to help remove smells. To make your own deodorizers:
I have a dog door in my house. Although my dogs use it regularly, one of my dogs is afraid to go out when it is raining heavily, and has peed on the carpet a few times at night without my knowledge. I didn’t know about it until it had dried. Please don’t judge. Nobody wants their pet to pee in the house. It’s so frustrating and embarrassing.

Is your dog still going on the floor? Getting dog urine out of your carpet doesn’t have to be hard, but you’ll need to act quickly. Dog urine that is allowed to dry will not only stain the carpet, but will make it easier for harmful bacteria to start multiplying. The following are ways to get dog urine odor out of the carpet to prevent future repeat incidents.
3) You might be treating a surface stain, but this does nothing to clean the padding. That’s where the odor comes from. That’s where bacteria grows. You have to kill what’s in the padding to make the carpet clean and to stop it from smelling.
5. Super easy to clean for storage after use . The machine comes apart very easy and it is also easy to remove the beater bar/brush on the floor/front and rinse it out to remove all of that cat/dog hair from my many pets. I have A LOT of hair each time I use it. Simply run it under the faucet and everything rinses out. It also tells you in the instructions to use it with hot water cycle through at the end before you store it for a long period of time. I do this with my Little Green Machine, too, but not quite what they are telling you to do, so don’t do what I do because it isn’t what they are telling you to do. I set a bowl in the sink, turn the faucet on to hot tap water, run the water in the bowl, then stick the nozzle into the bowl and let it suck up clean water until the tank fills-empty, repeat, empty repeat, until the dirty water tank is running clear. That gets the soap and residue out of the lines along the way on both my Little Green as well as this machine, using the hand held hose attachment. You can remove the beater bar VERY EASILY and run it under the faucet to clear it from the soap, hair, etc. It only weighs 2 pounds, tops. Super easy to clean.
Commercial repellents are available in the form of sprays and contain different chemicals or natural compounds such as cayenne pepper that dogs don’t like and will avoid. If the dog has already soiled the carpet, clean it using an enzymatic cleaner or vinegar, and allow the carpets to dry completely. Spray the repellents generously and reapply as indicated on the label of the product you use.
The more powerful the motor you’re working with, the cleaner you’re going to be able to make sure you get things. A lower powered motor makes sense if you’re dealing with office carpet and the occasional coffee spill or just the dust that inevitably gets tracked in from outdoors.
Nothing works. Dried stains are bad, we wash them and stink is still there. Wet stains are more manageable, I do the paper towel trick then soak with the stain remover. But dried ones went thru the entire carpet and even thru the wood under carpet (how do I know? Replaced carpet once, the wood underneath was soaked with the stinker’s urine), so I have the smell all the time, just waiting my dog will pass away as she is very old and sick, and then we will put the hard wood. In the mean time, professional cleaning doesn not help, vet vaccuum that we own, does not help either. I am frustrated.
Certain foods — most notably asparagus. Asparagus is notorious for causing a foul, eggy or “cabbagy” stench that results from a sulfur compound called methyl mercaptan (also found in garlic and skunk secretions). Only 50 percent of people can smell asparagus pee because they have the required gene. Cutting off the tips of asparagus will reportedly prevent the pungent-smelling pee…but of course, this is the tastiest part!
This information refers to the general prevalence and incidence of these diseases, not to how likely they are to be the actual cause of Urine odor. Of the 12 causes of Urine odor that we have listed, we have the following prevalence/incidence information:
Try an enzymatic cleaner to start. Wet the area with cool distilled water, pouring a small amount around the perimeter of the stain, moving from the outside of the stain toward the center. Spray an enzymatic cleaner on the wet spot, and allow it to sit overnight. If your carpet is wool, make sure you’re using a wool-safe cleaner.
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You should now have a pretty good idea of how important it is to familiarize yourself with what’s normal for your pee. Urine is a window into the inner workings of your body and can function as an “early warning system” for detecting health problems.
I took in two street cats in 2006. They are excellent in grooming themselves and didn’t need any litter box training. One of the cats has a poop smell on his scruff while the other does not. I thought it may have been a temporary thing, but it is still very much there. Is there a natural way I can get rid of this odor, especially since it is directly located on cat’s scruff area? Thanks!
I foster dogs in addition to owning two of my own, so I have a lot of pups going through my house. Since they’re rescues and often times come from places where they haven’t even started on potty training, I have a lot of accidents in my house. And I do mean a lot. Pretty much everything you could imagine that could come out of either end of dog has probably ended up on my carpet at some point or another. Come spring time my backyard also turns into a mud pit, and I have dogs tearing in from the backyard tracking who knows what all over the place. In short, stain removers are a must at my house, and not only do they have to get the stain, but the smell as well. Unfortunately, it took me awhile to catch on to the fact that I could make my own and that they would work just as well as the dozen or so other expensive cleaners I’d tried before. Mud, blood, number 1 or number 2, here are 3 natural DIY solutions to keeping up on pet stains and odors.
Put on your rubber gloves, spray from the outside edge of the stain towards the middle, working the vinegar solution into the carpet fibers with your fingers or a clean, lint-free cloth, towards the middle of the stain.